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Four Wheels Good, Two Wheels Bad?

Winter BikingAt public meetings lately, there’s been a lot of support for bicycling and pedestrian safety improvements, but there’s been equally strong resistance.

A variety of improvements intended to slow traffic and create safer spaces for people on foot and bike have been opposed on grounds that they would, among other things:

  • Increase traffic hazards and reduce convenience for drivers
  • Not actually be useful for bike and pedestrian safety
  • Pose excessive obstacles to resident parking and brush disposal
  • Reduce access to home services for residents
  • Jeopardize the health and safety of senior citizens

At a community meeting last week with Prospect Avenue residents, neighbors’ concerns caused town engineer Bob Kiser and Princeton Council President Bernie Miller to conclude that they wouldn’t support any changes to the current roadway when recommending a package of street improvements to the Council in coming months.Minnesota town bike lane 2

Similar neighborhood objections have also recently arisen around repaving projects – and associated bike and pedestrian improvements – on Hamilton Avenue and Valley Road.

A stronggent and child on bikely stated view at many meetings is that Princeton is already a bike-friendly town. Somewhat surprisingly, experienced cyclists are often among the most vocal to testify against changes that are either meant to improve pedestrian comfort by removing bicycle riders from sidewalks, or to encourage bicycling by offering safer spaces for them on streets.

These cyclists basically argue that our streets are already safe for bicycling; that the improvements being contemplated would either make our roads more hazardous for cars or would cause disproportionately large problems for residents on the affected streets; and that, fundamentally, they are unnecessary.

My hope today is to solicit thoughts from Princetonians about the strength of this argument by asking readers to comment about their own comfort bicycling in Princeton. My hope is to generate information that is useful for our town’s leaders as they think through these questions.

Specifically, I hope that readers can share their observations today on any or all of the following questions (and if readers want to suggest others, by all means please do!):

  1. Do you bicycle in Princeton? Do you bicycle or have have you bicycled elsewhere that was much better?
  2. What’s good about Princeton for bicycling, and/or what are examples from elsewhere that you wish were true here?
  3. Where do you bicycle in Princeton?   On protected trails? On side streets?  On larger streets?Minnesota town bike lane
  4. Why do you bike? For recreation? For convenience? For health? For economic efficiency or necessity?
  5. Do you bike for errands?  To visit friends?  To go to work?
  6. What kinds of bike trips might you like to make but don’t?   And why don’t you make those trips?  Weather?  Road safety?   Time? Comfort? Self-image?
  7. Does the idea of biking for anything besides recreation seem “normal” to you, or “goofy”?
  8. Do you feel safe bicycling on streets in Princeton?
  9. Do you want to be able to bike more than you do now?
  10. If you’d like to bike more, what kinds of things would make the biggest difference for you?
  11. How old are you, and how comfortable a bicyclist are you?
  12. If you have children, do you discourage them from biking by themselves?  Why or why not?Mom biking kids
  13. Do your children, if you have any, bike more or less than you did when you were growing up?
  14. Do you wish your children could be more independent?   Do you think street safety is an obstacle to their being more independent?
  15. What do you think it would take for cars to drive more carefully around bicycles and pedestrians?
  16. Would you personally mind driving slower yourself if that meant everyone else were also driving slower?
  17. What kinds of drivers pose the greatest challenges to bicycling in our town?  Service vehicles?  Trucks? People cutting through the town? Ourselves? Younger drivers? Distracted drivers?
  18. Do you even think safety for bicyclists and pedestrians in our town is an important issue?  Why or why not?

Note: the post’s title is a reference to “Animal Farm”

Nat Bottigheimer

Nat Bottigheimer is a professional transportation planner and consultant with a background in public policy and real estate economics. He is currently working on TOD, streetcar, and bus dedicated lane planning projects in the Washington, DC region. He was a member of the Alexander Street University Place Task Force, and is a current member of the Princeton Traffic and Transportation and Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committees. He's married to Eve Ostriker, an astrophysicist at Princeton University; and has two daughters, one at PHS. The most recent family addition is Basil, a one-year old labradoodle who gives the term "active transportation" new meaning.

  • Hi, we’ve been cycle commuting from Plainsboro to Princeton for almost two weeks now, and I’m still pretty happy with cycling in Princeton (there is indeed an issue with parking off campus, but other than that.) Similarly Plainsboro, but there are a few “quirks” that might easily be straightened out, especially now while there is a lot of repainting going on. Do you know who to contact about cycling in Plainsboro?

  • Ha, any town that welcomes a protest probably doesn’t need it! 🙂 Great idea with the fun rides, thanks for posting about them here!

  • FreshAir

    No need to apologize. We’re all friends & neighbors here. You will find that many Princeton residents live & work with no connection to Princeton University (which was named after the town, not vice versa). The Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton Theological Seminary, ETS, Dow Jones, international pharmaceutical companies and many other fine entities in our region make weighty contributions to society. Surely, you will enhance the vitality & legacy that is Princeton, NJ, with your enthusiasm & presence. I’m already super impressed by your road warrior courage!!

  • Sam@Princeton-Fun-Ride

    Hi wannabe Critical Mass riders…
    I’d be right behind you for a Critical Mass ride, but I’m not sure Princeton would welcome one. In the meantime, I am running short, family-friendly bike rides on Saturday evenings – Google ‘Princeton Fun Ride’ to find all the details at my website. The rides are also listed on the ‘Events’ section right here on Planet Princeton. It’s a bit more orderly than Critical Mass and helmets are required, but it’s the same idea- get people out together riding around our beautiful town…

  • There are now many more cycle lanes in London, though there have still been several cyclists killed by “heavy goods vehicles” (big trucks) so there is still a lot of activism. I do like the critical mass cycle rides on Fridays, I’ve seen them both there & in Edinburgh. I’m not sure how effective they are but they certainly are larger than even I expect and I’m a cyclist, so maybe it gets the message across that this is not just an issue for a few people.

  • Sorry, **NO** town is “only” a campus and/or *only* a tourist town. Towns are defined as places where people have come together to live and work. Some towns have other cool things like campuses or tourists which while causing a few problems, generally make them more fun to live in and more economically viable. The challenge of governance is to balance the needs and benefit everyone who lives and works in a town. I don’t think I’ve suggested anything that hurts anyone, and I’ve suggested a few things that might help a good number of people, most especially focussing on the residents, which I would consider myself one though I’m hoping to live just across the dreaded by car drivers route 1.

  • FreshAir

    So glad to read that you experienced dedicated cycle lanes on Europe’s busy streets. Here, dangerous “sharrows” are actually all that is provided on some heavily trafficked roads. Bike safely and watch out for potholes!

  • FreshAir

    one sentence above should read: B n B, the only an “anti-bike sentiment” I see in Princeton is Council’s belief that bikers belong on the asphalt right next to cars & potholes.

  • FreshAir

    Absolutely Agreed. US reliance on fossil fuels & lack of support to provide cleaner technologies is shameful. Use of E85 is a compromise/stop gap measure, not a final solution. Hydrogen technologies are on the horizon, but corporate economics slow innovation. NJ Transit isn’t wind or solar powered. That’s why dedicated bike/human activity paths are needed now to expand clean mobility. SFB, we also agree that the road conditions (traffic, potholes, fumes) & drivers with moving violations (always reprieved by the legal system) place bikers in very hazardous, unhealthy situations. Princeton should protect & support people who wish use clean options for mobility, with dedicated paths & supportive public policy. It is better to demand these accomodations & demand innovations, than to accept the health compromising options being discussed by governments/corporations/planners.

  • FreshAir

    In answer to your question: Princeton’s small population (-30,000) cannot supply the ridership to support an independent rail “streetcar” system. NJs electric power grid contributes to global warming. So, light rail “streetcars” just aren’t clean, affordable, or sustainable for taxpayers. As for wheeled “streetcars”, ridership tells us our “FreeB” is either underutilized or over-sized (depending on how you want to look at it). Our failing, dirty, unsafe NJ Transit system is connected to us by Princeton’s odd taxi “system”. That “system” embodies our town’s reliance on an embarrassing, over-priced dinosaur. Practical, sustainable ways to support a healthy, beautiful Princeton exist: Dedicated bike/human powered activity paths will protect & improve health & happiness. Moving people through the municipality in small clean, ethanol, natural gas, (someday hydrogen powered) FFV mini-vans is affordable & sustainable. An affordable, smart, small “green” taxi system running on E85 is needed. A local E85 fuel & recharging station is needed, for personal autos in the hood. Lowering registration & parking fees for tiny, clean Smart cars & FFVs will encourage their use, reduce global warming, & support sustainability. Planners envision Princeton’s working class waiting on street corners & outdoor platforms in all weather conditions, for NJ Transit to arrive on an intermittent schedule. This old school vision disrespects human time, human health, & human energy, & should not be expanded beyond our main arteries. People deserve safe biking and other options for clean, easy mobility. Social equality, health & freedom should be created for everyone. Taxi medals & $20 fares?? Cut us a break!!!! Taxis are cleaner & cheaper in Tokyo. (Yes, cars & taxis are even welcomed in the world’s most populated city as one VITAL component of a clean, very efficient system that gets people where they need to be on time.)
    B n B, the only anti-bike sentiment I see in Princeton is Council’s belief that putting bikers belong on asphalt next to cars & potholes. Perhaps the most restrictive place in the world for autos is Singapore… but in Singapore, there is no snow & motorbikes are allowed everywhere. Will that “no motorcylces” sign ever be removed from the Spring Street garage? I kinda doubt it. Nat writes about restricting autos & eliminating parking to build a mass transit/platform anchored life. Guess we will be squeezed into traffic or into rail cars till it hurts.

  • FreshAir

    Joanna, Princeton has true, defined, municipal boundaries. Princeton is a suburban town. It’s a town because slightly less than 30,000 people live, work, play, go to school, raise families & create memories here. It has a true defined population too. Sad, that you believe that Princeton is only a campus & tourist town. My friends & I dedicate serious time, money & energy building community here. To us, Princeton is a lot MORE than a breadbasket for academics & businesses. Long before Princeton University was established…long before “Nassau Hall” was called “NJ College” & even the “US Capitol” for awhile…families called Princeton “home”. America’s freedom from British rule was announced publicly for the first time here in Princeton…and so, our FREEDOM from taxation without representation was declared right here. People living in Plainsboro, Lawrenceville, West Windsor, & other surrounding towns aren’t living IN Princeton. Princeton taxpayers deserve ONE zip code to make that clear, but realtors & businesses are allowed to trade on our town name outside of our boundaries for profit. Outsiders may feel that Princeton’s taxpayers owe them more of an “experience” because of our generosity that way. Truth is, with the exception of Princeton’s wealthy business owners & chain store managers, most of us don’t want or deserve an increased tax burden to make transit improvements to bring in more tourists. Be careful with your numbers & boundaries, please. When you are in Princeton, know that you are receiving a warm welcome to a suburban town by people who came here before Princeton University & LEGOS . Our ancestors blood soaked the soil here, hoping to protect us from people wanting to take our earnings & land for their gain. Residents here are part of a great American community. I hope you will join us, & learn firsthand how wonderful it is. Like you, I hope there are more bikes & bike racks someday.

  • SFB

    “With clean technologies available to propel vehicles”
    LOL, what clean technologies are those again? Even if you drive an all-electric vehicle, the energy still comes 90% from fossil fuels and nukes. In New Jersey, it’s mostly nukes, but with a good proportion of fracked natural gas too. If you drive a hybrid or regular car, 100% of the energy comes from burning fossil fuels.

  • Zoe Brookes

    Yes, I was not being accurate with my words. I learned to cycle commute in London in the nineties. There were few bike lanes and those were typically shared with buses. I learned a lot of assertive body language and eye contact and how to give motorists a friendly look when they were clearly doing me a courtesy. The other European countries I visited were further ahead on this. Call mine the “London Cyclist Critical Mass” approach!

  • Actually, the German train company runs bicycle rental stations at every town with a train station because they don’t want everyone bringing their bikes on the train. Maybe Amtrak could make a profit if they followed suit…

  • Princeton isn’t a suburb, it’s a campus & tourist town, due to a university. It technically has a population of 20K, but really more like at least 40K since at least one if its borders is arbitrary. Billund, Denmark is a campus town due to a company (LEGO), is in the middle of nowhere, has less than 7,000 inhabitants, and has separate bike lanes for all its major roads. Antwerp, Netherlands is a campus & tourist town of 500K with a citybike scheme. Strasbourg is a campus & tourist town with really cheap private bike rental ($60 per week, in Princeton it is $250 per week.) Antwerp & Strasbourg are accessible from major tourist centres by train, like Princeton is. Presumably Princeton could bring in more tourists and tourist money if the townships got together on a “city” bike scheme. Billund you can only get to by plane or car – the bike lanes are just standard in Denmark & demanded by the population, even though they all also own cars. New Jersey is one of the most affluent states so presumably could be more like Denmark, Princeton could kick that off.

  • I agree that this makes sense where there is little or slow enough traffic, but I wouldn’t call it a European Approach, all the European towns and cities I’ve been in that have cyclists also have cycle routes or lanes, except on small streets where cars are rarer than pedestrians.

  • l hunt

    I’d like to point out that a bike route to the hospital exists @ Scudders Mill Road. While it’s not for an E.R. visit, you might get a better blood pressure reading if you go by bike. Less than 3 miles, park at the door.

  • Biker ‘n’ Buser

    Ask some pointed questions about what might stimulate a motorist to occasionally try using an alternative to private automobile transportation; e.g., walking and/or bicycling and/or public transit. What are basic expectations, for alternatives to solely automobile reliance, from a motorist’s perspective?

  • Biker ‘n’ Buser

    Bless your open-mindedness garnered from experience elsewhere! But Princeton’s recent episode of decommissioning its longtime ‘Dinky’ shuttle train terminal and right-of-way is a sad indicator of a provincial viewpoint that ignores too many such things outside its own political borders.

  • Buser ‘n’ Biker

    Are you then ruling out the notion of streetcar service and the like? Seems to be a growing anti-transit and anti-biking sentiment in town, i.e. private automobiles first and foremost forever (so much for real ecological sustainability!)..

  • Biker ‘n’ buser

    Another option: For quite a few years now, NJ Transit local buses (lines 605, 606, 655) have been equipped with front bicycle racks with capacity for two bikes each. So, cyclists can utilize both bike and bus on trips when desired.

  • Douglas Rubin

    West Windsor Bicycle Alliance is a very active organization that are great advocates for alternatives to automobiles in that sprawl of a township.
    .
    They have some great resources and ideas for making bicycling to / from the places a lot of us go to regularly a bit easier.

  • Douglas Rubin

    Biking in Princeton is actually pretty good. There are lots of places to go within a few miles that obviate the need for driving in many cases.
    A lot of people bicycle here. Most are pretty courteous.
    I prefer to bike on the roads because bicycles should “own” a piece of the road. I am not a fan of bikepaths and sidewalks-called-bikepaths (to get transportation funding), because pedestrians, with their dogs and earbuds aren’t conducive to through-pedaling.
    I bike for recreation and as an effective transportation option in many cases.
    I bike for errands downtown or the Shopping Center quite a bit.
    Generally, I feel safe. Some clue-less drivers can put anyone not encased in metal and airbags in danger
    No. I bike almost as much as I want to.
    Biking could be encouraged with higher parking rates reflecting the price of land. I like the discount that the Whole Earth Center offers, because it means, theoretically, that they don’t have to set aside as many parking spots!
    I am 56 years old and I am very comfortable biking.
    I wish my 13+ year-old son would bike, but he can avoid having to do so because he can usually get a ride if he holds out.
    My son will become more independent when he decides to be.
    I think most cars are pretty mind-ful of bicyclists. I am both a driver and a bicyclist so I feel sensitive to both types of vehicles sharing the road.
    The main arterials should process traffic faster and have generous shoulders (like NJ-27 or Rosedale). If traffic is slowed on “main roads,” there will be more people taking “shortcuts’ through neighborhoods. Like Ewing as an alternative to all the lights on Harrison.
    Older drivers are sometimes not as effective in their judgment and reactions as they think they are.
    IMO, pedestrians that don’t cross in walks or don’t obey lights, and bicyclists that use sidewalks downtown are just as dangerous to safety as distracted drivers.

  • whoswho12

    I want to begin by saying that I am really disturbed that people ride their bikes on sidewalks in town. Sidewalks are for pedestrians or very young cyclists with their parents. When cyclists do things like ride on the sidewalk or ride the wrong way down streets or ride side by side, they give a bad name to all cyclists. If cyclists want greater consideration of their needs, they need to be respectful of laws.

    I bicycle in Princeton for errands and to get to work. I do it for the environment and for my health, but also because I love feeling more connected to the world around me. I feel safe cycling in Princeton, but want to add that cycling anywhere requires a immense amount of focus and attention. Sharrows, bike lanes, dedicated bike trails–none of these absolve the cyclist of the responsibility of paying attention, thinking and looking ahead, and being aware of all possibilities for danger.

    Except for the busiest roads with higher speed limits, I think sharrows, in conjunction with well-maintained roads and ideally, where feasible, some kind of a shoulder, are sufficient for cyclists to travel safely in our town.

    I plan my routes carefully, avoiding routes that have a lot of traffic, or are very narrow and have no shoulder, or contain difficult intersections. I’m fortunate that most places I ride to in town allow me to go on side streets for the most part. But there needs to be continuity and connections. For example, there is no shoulder and there are no sharrows on Ewing between Rt. 206 and where it becomes Harrison St. The sharrows begin at the intersection of Harrison and Bunn Drive. But how is a cyclist to get to that point safely? Why wasn’t a shoulder and sharrows included in that stretch of Ewing when it was repaved recently?

    I am 60 years old and am a strong cyclist. I don’t ride my bike when there’s snow, ice, or heavy rain. Brush and leaf piles are a big problem and I think Princeton should be more rigorous in enforcing rules about not putting that stuff out ahead of time. There’s a pile of branches right now at the intersection of Jefferson and Valley that’s been there for weeks–right where cyclists need to stop at the intersection.

    I think the best thing that could happen for cycling in Princeton is for more people to do it. And naturally, I think the safety of cyclists and pedestrians is a very important issue. There needs to be more attention paid to this issue and more efforts at public education. The town government needs to do more than just say they support cycling and walking. I think the town needs to make a big public effort (over and over and over again) to educate drivers on how to share the road with cyclists. And Princeton Police (who are not exactly busy with a high crime rate) need to focus on ticketing speeders and aggressive drivers.

    Finally, I think the town needs to focus on improvements that work in towns the size of Princeton. When things like an 8 ft. wide multi-use path are proposed, of course residents are going to freak out. Something like that is completely inappropriate for residential neighborhoods in a small town. I get frustrated when proponents of major changes to the infrastructure of Princeton cite (and ask for) changes that were made in large cities. Accommodations for cyclists not only have to not alienate residents but they should also be reasonable and feasible for a town of our size.

    I spent last summer in Minneapolis and it was bike heaven. There are bike paths around the lakes, a large, amazing system of bike trails that are separate from roads, and separate bike lanes in downtown streets. But none of those things is feasible for Princeton and I get tired of local cycling advocates bitterly demeaning the town of Princeton and its residents because we don’t give approval to big infrastructure projects that are inappropriate for a town of our size. There needs to be more sensitivity about how hard it is to change people’s minds and what people value in their neighborhood. The process of making things better for cyclists might seem slow and incremental but it is an essential and important one. Respectful public education is key.

  • FreshAir

    Spokesman, you misunderstand. We are ALL entitled to reasonable freedoms in the USA… everyone’s needs should be respected here. I bike regularly, do distance cycling, & drive. I want no exceptions… but cannot deny my lifelong love of biking & my family’s need for me to drive a car.
    My work has educated me about many tragic outcomes when vehicles strike humans. Skin, bones, muscle & tissue make a fragile shell for human life. Irreversible damage happens the moment of impact. I deeply believe that cars, trucks & bikes don’t belong on the SAME piece of asphalt.

    Here in the suburbs there IS room to meet ALL human needs. With easements & sidewalks along many roads here, you can’t convince me there’s not enough space for dedicated bike paths & multi-use paths. The multi-use path along Mt. Lucas serves everyone well & is promising. Boulder, CO hasn’t been mentioned. If you’ve ever biked there, you know that great possibilities exist when space is dedicated for human-powered activities. 


    Princeton’s “sharrows” force bikers to suck up damaging exhaust fumes from motorized vehicles. Bikers pedal perilously here, on edges next to steep ditches, to get to local parks. “Sharrows” do a HUGE disservice to Princeton’s bikers, as they compromise health & safety. In my opinion, “sharrows” should only be accepted in cities where there is no space & no other option.
    Safe, healthy biking paths are needed in Princeton. In my opinion, driving 15 to 25 MPH in town & 35MPH on outlying roads is also a basic need in suburban areas, where people have to get to work, to the train, etc.
    Show your statistics to a biker paralyzed by a young driver, a hospitalized parent hit by an SUV, or my friend whose foot was completely severed by a car. These are the some of the many who (barely) survived biking in “sharrows” near distracted drivers.

  • FreshAir

    Agree with you completely, MB. Dedicated paths are safe for bikers and drivers.

  • SpokesMan

    “Slowing traffic below the current MPH on most of Princeton’s roadways would take away freedom of proper movement, add more stress, and be another example of power misused to control people.”

    So people driving cars are entitled to “freedom of proper movement”? What about anyone else?

    And again, “increase people’s freedom, joy, AND safety.” Except for those people not driving cars?

    You’re being rather exceptional aren’t you? Your freedom at everyone else’s expense.

    I’m sorry, your post clearly defines your’s and many other peoples’ attitude, but defies logic and basic well-known statistics and research.

    However, this doesn’t seem to be unusual in the university town of Princeton.

  • FreshAir

    “Four Wheels GOOD, Two Wheels GOOD” or “All Wheels GOOD” are the titles I hope Council members endorse. Anyone creating public policy should be willing to explore creative ideas that accommodate ALL mobility needs. I bike & drive, & enjoy BOTH options. So do many other people here.
    We should strive to be a community where all reasonable needs are supported. Friendly, inclusive, smart public policies & education about environmentally clean choices are needed & what the US “culture” is really about. The labels “good” and “bad” are not what the US is about.
    With clean technologies available to propel vehicles, it’s unwise & unrealistic to be down on powered vehicles in the US suburbs. WIth biking being such a great activity and so clean, it should also be supported.

  • Pat Palmer

    I do bicycle–but I strongly prefer the sidewalks because of rampant speeding by cars on town streets (especially along Harrison St).

    Sharrows seem to be helpful, reminding drivers to watch for cyclists and informing those possibly ignorant that bicycles have a right to be on the road as well as cars.

    Cyclists on sidewalks need to be REQUIRED to have a bell and use it when approaching pedestrians from behind. I’ve nearly been run over several times, and it’s frightening. I tinkle my bell politely if approaching folks from behind (and I slow down too).

    I regret that the bike lane was nixed for Hamilton Av, because I think the narrower driving lanes would act as traffic calming, reducing speed for some drivers. However, I also felt for the residents concerned about losing on-street parking rights.

    IMO, every single street should at least have sharrows!

  • SFB

    1. Do you bicycle in Princeton? Do you bicycle or have have you bicycled elsewhere that was much better?
    – Yes. Yes (Ghent).

    2. What’s good about Princeton for bicycling, and/or what are examples from elsewhere that you wish were true here?
    – ‘Good’: Several low-traffic streets that make for pleasant riding. ‘Wish were true here’: dedicated cycle facilities to make cycling comfortable on busier streets.

    3. Where do you bicycle in Princeton? On protected trails? On side streets? On larger streets?
    – All of the above, but I aim for quieter streets where possible.

    4. Why do you bike? For recreation? For convenience? For health? For economic efficiency or necessity?
    – I ride my bike to get where I need to be, and occasionally just for fun.

    5. Do you bike for errands? To visit friends? To go to work?
    – Yes to visit friends, ‘No’ for going to work (too dangerous).

    6. What kinds of bike trips might you like to make but don’t? And why don’t you make those trips? Weather? Road safety? Time? Comfort? Self-image?
    – I’d like to commute to work by bike, at least some days, but the roads are too dangerous.

    7. Does the idea of biking for anything besides recreation seem “normal” to you, or “goofy”?
    – Normal, not goofy.

    8. Do you feel safe bicycling on streets in Princeton?
    – Depends on the street, but in general, it is hard to complete any trip without going on at least one road which feels dangerous.

    9. Do you want to be able to bike more than you do now?
    – Yes.

    10. If you’d like to bike more, what kinds of things would make the biggest difference for you?
    – Redesign busy streets to make them safer for cycling. Wiggins and Witherspoon Street would be two that need particular attention.

    11. How old are you, and how comfortable a bicyclist are you?
    Mid-30s, pretty comfortable on a bike.

    12. If you have children, do you discourage them from biking by themselves? Why or why not?
    – Too young for riding alone, but at the right age, I would support cycling, but with limits. They would need to stay on sidewalks in many parts of town.

    13. Do your children, if you have any, bike more or less than you did when you were growing up?
    – N/A.

    14. Do you wish your children could be more independent? Do you think street safety is an obstacle to their being more independent?
    – N/A

    15. What do you think it would take for cars to drive more carefully around bicycles and pedestrians?
    – Meaningful changes in liability laws, so that drivers were held responsible for crashes involving unprotected road users. Realistically, human behavior is such that it is better to use engineering to find ways to enable all road users to share roads safely, as has been achieved in other communities.

    15. Would you personally mind driving slower yourself if that meant everyone else were also driving slower?
    – Not really, but I don’t see safe streets as necessarily being about everybody driving more slowly, In some cases, such as on neighborhood streets, that would be appropriate. On arterial roads, proper facilities should allow safe operation of cars at the current posted speed limits, but in many cases that is not appropriate right now.

    16. What kinds of drivers pose the greatest challenges to bicycling in our town? Service vehicles? Trucks? People cutting through the town? Ourselves? Younger drivers? Distracted drivers?
    – I am not inclined to engage in a blame game, because I think that any operation of a heavy vehicle at high speed carries risks, and it is up to the community to find ways to accommodate those vehicles in a safe way. I do have a bit of a problem with landscaping trucks and trailers parking on local roads though, because they often obscure sightlines and increase risks for cyclists and pedestrians.

    17. Do you even think safety for bicyclists and pedestrians in our town is an important issue? Why or why not?

    Yes. Being able to choose to complete a journey by any means is an important freedom, and currently that freedom is taken away because of a lack of safety. Second, I don’t think we can fit many more cars in this state, so we need to make it easier for people to get around without using cars. This is even more important when we consider that cars are the biggest source of pollution contributing to climate change.

  • SpokesMan

    I don’t know without a great deal of thought. Any questions are always going to to be loaded, and really, your points are not ones I see as useful, since they don’t really address the issue of culture. What are roads for? Are they to facilitate the passage of superior beings in a bubble of ICE, GPS, smooth automatic transmission and leather upholstery to their important engagements, or are they the synapses and arteries of your neighbourhood, town, city, society? So should they embrace everyone, or just the motoratti? Really, is there a sense of entitlement when you’re driving a car? Okay, a bicycle for that matter. Sorry, you’ve landed this on me so I’m not more responsive, but honestly, most questions elicit and prompt the responses they want to get. Pity I’m moving from Princeton, although I suspect it won’t be any different where I’m going.

  • Elon Parent

    Do you bicycle in Princeton? YES
    Do you bicycle or have have you bicycled elsewhere that was much better? DIFFERENT. I.E., SAN FRANCISCO IS WELL LAID OUT BUT NOT APPROPRIATE FOR PRINCETON.
    What’s good about Princeton for bicycling, and/or what are examples from elsewhere that you wish were true here? THERE ARE MANY ROUTES AROUND THE MAIN ROADS.
    Where do you bicycle in Princeton? On protected trails? On side streets? On larger streets? ALL STREETS, OR A COMBINATION OF TOWPATH AND STREETS.
    Why do you bike? For recreation? YES For convenience? For health? YES For economic efficiency or necessity?
    Do you bike for errands? To visit friends? To go to work? YES AND TO GO OUT TO DINNER IN PRINCTON.
    What kinds of bike trips might you like to make but don’t? And why don’t you make those trips? Weather? Road safety? Time? Comfort? Self-image? IF I HAD A SHOWER IN MY OFFICE I WOULD RIDE TO WORK MORE OFTEN. ALSO BUSINESS CASUAL IS ONLY IN THE SUMMER SO FORMAL WEAR THE REST OF THE YEAR MAKES IT DIFFICULT.
    Does the idea of biking for anything besides recreation seem “normal” to you, or “goofy”? NO
    Do you feel safe bicycling on streets in Princeton? SOMEWHAT
    Do you want to be able to bike more than you do now? YES
    If you’d like to bike more, what kinds of things would make the biggest difference for you?
    How old are you, and how comfortable a bicyclist are you? 53, AND VERY COMFORTABLE
    If you have children, do you discourage them from biking by themselves? NO Why or why not?
    Do your children, if you have any, bike more or less than you did when you were growing up? LESS
    Do you wish your children could be more independent? Do you think street safety is an obstacle to their being more independent?
    What do you think it would take for cars to drive more carefully around bicycles and pedestrians? CAR DRIVERS MUST CHANGE THEIR MINDSEST ON GOING AS FAST AS THEY CAN ALL THE TIME. THEIR LEVEL OF ANGER AND FRUSTRATION IS THE SINGLE MOST DANGEROUS FACET OF CYCLING IN PRINCETON.
    Would you personally mind driving slower yourself if that meant everyone else were also driving slower? YES
    What kinds of drivers pose the greatest challenges to bicycling in our town? Service vehicles? Trucks? People cutting through the town? Ourselves? Younger drivers? Distracted drivers? ALL. SHOCKING THE SIZE OF TRUCKS THAT GO THROUGH PRINCETON AND KINGSTON
    Do you even think safety for bicyclists and pedestrians in our town is an important issue? Why or why not? YES. PRINCETON IS A SMALL TOWN WITH MANY PEDISTRIANS AND CYCLISTS AND A SMALL-TOWN SHOPPING AREA. CARS CLOG THESE ROADS AS THOROUGHFARES WHICH THE ROADS WERE NEVER BUILT FOR SUCH TRAFFIC. SOMETHING BAD IS BOUND TO HAPPEN.

  • Nat Bottigheimer

    I’ve been thinking a lot about this valid point and how to address it. Can you suggest questions that would stimulate the same kind of thoughtful responses that so many have made here over the last day? Perhaps things like: do you enjoy driving in and around town? when you drive, do you feel anxious about finding parking or about the behavior of other drivers? does driving feel like productive time, or like wasted time? do you not make driving trips that you’d want to make because of the hassle? do you make too many driving trips, and do you wish you could make less? Are these the kinds of questions you have in mind?

  • SpokesMan

    My point is; any response we – people who sometimes ride bicycles – may come up with will meet a, “Yes … But …” response. I want to see motorists, or if you like, people who habitually drive cars, have their responses put on the spot. Justify Princeton’s car based infrastructure over the case for a safe and healthy environment for everyone.

  • Zoe Brookes

    Good tips. I knew about the canal, but it is slow for a commute. I like the Mulberry Street tip though…..

  • Zoe Brookes

    Good tip. I didn’t know about going through the golf course

  • Anne B

    For getting to Market Fair mall, have you tried taking the D&R Canal towpath to the golf course (Princeton Country Club), then thru the golf course to Wheeler Way? You still have to go a short distance on Canal Pointe, but only a couple blocks.

  • Anne B

    For getting to Trenton, are you aware that you can take the D&R Canal towpath right to Montgomery, Broad, or Warren Street? Access the towpath at Alexander or from Quaker Road. Or if you want to ride more on the road and less on the path, you can continue on Mercer Street / Princeton Pike, to Princeton Ave, then (near Halo Farm) take Mulberry Street past Rt 1 to get onto the paved section of the towpath. (This section was opened a couple of years ago.)

  • Rob Dodge

    1. Yes, for over 15 years I have been biking for pleasure and commuting in Princeton and from Princeton
    to South Brunswick, Hopewell, and Lawrenceville

    2. The sharrows are amazing. My own experience and discussion with other long term bikers is they have transformed cycling in Princeton. Please repaint them, many are faded past recognition. I have also bike commuted in Seattle, main difference here in Princeton is the number of bikers (critical mass), infrastructure is not so different except on major roads the likes of which Princeton does not have. In Seattle for example, when many cars and many bikes are used to sharing the road, there is rarely a problem.

    3. On every type of street.

    4. Mostly I bike for transportation, occasionally for recreation.

    5. Yes, Yes, Yes

    6. Weather (ice in winter) or carrying passengers or very heavy
    items.

    7. Normal. I am in European cities several times a year and in Bay area and Seattle, all places that have
    thousands of daily bikers.

    8. After the sharrows were painted, I have never felt it dangerous to bike in Princeton.

    9. No.

    10. NA

    11. 51 and very comfortable.

    12. Yes, I have children who regularly bike commute to school. It is a big problem that the Princeton Police refuse to address that cars do not stop for children in crosswalks. I understand the children don’t vote but a policy of refusing to ticket adults who don’t stop for children in crosswalks, especially around the schools, is unacceptable.

    13. Same or a little more.

    14. See answer 12.

    15. My experience is almost all drivers in Princeton are considerate of bikers.

    16. ?

    17. I agree with previous poster, leaf piles, yard debris in the streets are a much bigger danger than any kind of driver.

    18. Yes

  • FreshAir

    Agreed. Sharrows are not a good solution.

  • Jan

    Apparently the municipal ordinance was changed. Why are leaves and branches permitted to be placed within 3 feet from the curb?

  • Zoe Brookes

    This is a good idea. Driver awareness and a culture of cycling would be more effective than big investments in structural pathways.

  • Zoe Brookes

    I stick with the European approach that we have to take our place in the traffic and get the cars to slow down. Bike paths are really lovely, but not realistic with land prices as they are. Who’s for a critical mass ride?

  • Zoe Brookes

    Yes! to the leaf piles. Worse hazard in the dark than any car.

  • Zoe Brookes

    Welcome to Princeton! You can get a lot done by bike here, but the lack of plowing is sometimes the limit. And I have to haul gear and other people’s children, which makes things tough. It is much harder to get out of town than around it. I think we’re still limited to the European ex-pats who think it’s normal and a few mavericks. I’m stunned by how few people will allow their children to ride. it does the kids a disservice not to learn this skill. Good luck!

  • Zoe Brookes

    That’s a lot of questions, but you’re asking the questions I thought someone should, so here goes:
    1. Yes I do and no, most places I have biked have been worse
    2. I think Princeton is fine for biking
    3. I bike everywhere. I avoid Alexander Rd if I can
    4. I like biking. I do it becuase I’m happier on a bike. I drive when I have stuff to carry, or I need to get to Trenton, which is a beast to bike to. I’d love to see a bike path down 206 – now that would make a difference
    5. yes, yes and yes
    6. Time stops me, and the need to carry people and stuff. And I don’t bike to other workouts, generally. Safety never stops me in town, but it does stop me biking to Trenton
    7. Normal
    8. Yes
    9. See note on Trenton
    10. see 9.
    11. 47 I’m very comfortable. I grew up biking and commuted in London. I think that’s at the heart of why I’m comfortable. I’m used to reading traffic and making bike-safe decisions, not always fro speed
    12. I invest a lot in helping my children bike safely. I think a lot more could be done to teach kids to be independent and savvy on their bikes, and to pick safe routes
    13. Two of them less, one about the same
    14. Street safety around Route 1 and 206 is an obstacle to my children’s independence. I would like them to be able to ride to Forrestal Village, Market Fair and up Cherry Hill Rd but none are sufficiently safe.
    15. A critical mass of bicycles on the road. Driving in London these days is an instructional lesson in going very slowly and looking all around you. Well lit bikes and well-clad cycles help a lot too. I daresay drivers ed could focus a little more on cyclists also
    16. No
    17. Inattentive drivers, particularly those using Hamilton Ave as a rat run. Cyclists MUST learn to navigate around big vehicles if they are to share the road. I think that narrow roads that force cars to swerve are the most dangerous. I would like to see alternative routes to all of these. Sharrows are an ineffective joke.
    18. No, I don’t. I think it’s way overblown.

  • FreshAir

    I bike often and I drive often in Princeton. I also recycle, compost, reduce, and reuse everything humanly possible…keeping the carbon footprint of my family the equivalent of one baby shoe. (Reuseable shopping bags have been used for decades)

    While many Princetonians want our town to live like a city…it is a suburb. That reality makes a car essential for my environmentally-conscious family to survive, thrive, and enjoy all the opportunities and necessities of suburban life. Trips to the hospital are one example of a transportation need that requires a car here.

    Modern science tells us that socializing with others is a great thing for health and happiness. A car is a great place to catch up a busy family members. Anyone
    who has no kids may not get this point. Anyone who lives with teens does. Biking is fun with family too, but not safe in a group on our roads at present.

    So, it seems to me that ALL forms of mobility…power-assisted and human-powered…need to be accommodated for people to live happily, without stress, in the suburbs. Fortunately, Princeton has many beautiful roadways. These make getting outdoors on foot, or on wheels a delight to the senses.

    Dedicated paths for bikers and walkers on active roadways are the optimal solution and the safest option, in my opinion. I see no reason why roads with two sidewalks couldn’t be easily converted to achieve this. The large paved path alongside Mt. Lucas is another example of a promising development in Princeton for bikers and pedestrians. That path is wide enough to be shared safely by both, and keeps slower moving walkers and bikers off the roadway. It accommodates the few who use it very well.

    Vehicles with four or more wheels need dedicated roadways too. Slowing traffic below the current MPH on most of Princeton’s roadways would take away freedom of proper movement, add more stress, and be another example of power misused to control people. Our roads are relatively safe. Most drivers are careful. Drivers who aren’t paying attention are the hazard. Absent minded drivers are the reason vehicles and bikes don’t belong on the same patch of asphalt.

    The idea of narrowing roadways that carry ambulance, fire,rescue, delivery and service vehicles around our town is ridiculous. Vehicles come in all widths and sizes. Bikers are injured by side-view mirrors, poor drivers, car doors opening, and more. When I drive around Cleveland Lane’s little roundabout I don’t say a word…I just listen to my kids laugh at how silly it is every time. It is hard for us to imagine an ambulance, fire truck OR biker negotiating that easily if coming from Lafayette Street. Why would anyone want to shrink a valuable resource like our roadways at a cost to taxpayers?

    Planners who dream about housing people in micro-units, taking away parking for residents, creating urbanity where there is beauty, and taking away freedom suggest shrinking life as our best “solution”. I don’t buy that, and I don’t think Princeton should.

    There are solutions that increase people’s freedom, joy, AND safety. I hope Princeton’s town Council will get creative and and encourage those…instead of teenie-weenie roads and other teenie-weenie options.

  • Sandsmith

    What about three wheels? There are several recumbent trikes on the streets – great rides for the getting older crowd – with flags. I can testify there are few problems with these, I go all over town.

  • my responses

    Do you bicycle in Princeton?

    Not at much as I’d like to.

    Do you bicycle or have have you bicycled elsewhere that was much better?
    Several places that are better. From major cities to sprawled out suburbs. Where planning and commitment are there, biking is enjoyable and efficient.

    What’s good about Princeton for bicycling, and/or what are examples from elsewhere that you wish were true here?
    Princeton is beautiful and feels relatively safe in terms of social environment and people. Many destinations are in bikeable distance. However, the roads are impossibly unsafe for a rider like me, crossings are inconsistently safe, and there are not enough bike paths.

    Where do you bicycle in Princeton? On protected trails? On side streets? On larger streets?
    I bike on the sidewalks of middle-level streets, that is, NOT on Nassau/27, 206, Mercer, 518 or even busier parts of Alexander or Harrison, but do bike more on Wiggins/Paul Robeson, Witherspoon, Valley Rd, Prospect, Ewing, usually on sidewalks though I understand that is not ideal.

    Why do you bike? For recreation? For convenience? For health? For economic efficiency or necessity?
    For all of the above. Its more pleasant and feels more in touch with people out and about to bike. I say “hi” to more friends and acquaintances biking than taking the car. And you get a discount at Whole Earth when biking there.

    Do you bike for errands? To visit friends? To go to work?
    Errands, activities, to go exercise/workout at the gym, not too work because the shower/changing is very awkward at my work. And because I don’t like the ride home from work when its dark.

    What kinds of bike trips might you like to make but don’t? And why
    don’t you make those trips? Weather? Road safety? Time? Comfort?
    Self-image?
    Would like to take some long scenic trips up and down the towpath or to nearby towns. Don’t have proper gear for all contingencies though.

    Does the idea of biking for anything besides recreation seem “normal” to you, or “goofy”?
    No, and anyway “goofy” is fine with me.

    Do you feel safe bicycling on streets in Princeton?
    Not at all with regard to traffic. The drivers are too fast, the roads are too narrow and drivers don’t know what to do in close proximity to bikers. As a driver, I don’t know either so I’m not saying people are not well intentioned. The roads are in bad shape. Parked cars creates more complexity, too.

    Do you want to be able to bike more than you do now?
    Yes.

    If you’d like to bike more, what kinds of things would make the biggest difference for you?
    Dedicated bike paths. Routes with bike paths that are logically connected and have good crossings at major intersections. Bike paths. I’d give up parking and give up two ways to make a one-way for more bike paths.

    How old are you, and how comfortable a bicyclist are you?
    50-something. Not as comfortable as I was when I biked more, am a little rusty.

    If you have children, do you discourage them from biking by themselves? Why or why not?
    No because biking on roads is not safe and the kids seem a little clueless about navigating the sidewalks with pedestrians.

    Do your children, if you have any, bike more or less than you did when you were growing up?
    I grew up here in Princeton and my children bike far less than we did “back then”.

    Do you wish your children could be more independent? Do you think
    street safety is an obstacle to their being more independent?
    Great question. Yes, and Yes.

    What do you think it would take for cars to drive more carefully around bicycles and pedestrians?
    I think we need significant, dramatic traffic calming signage and even physical barriers or “soft signs” that look like barriers but actually yield if hit. We need enforcement. We need a willingness to REALLY slow down traffic through town. Maybe get rid of some street parking. Maybe make some streets one way, or “narrow” the streets to discourage speeding.

    Would you personally mind driving slower yourself if that meant everyone else were also driving slower?
    I drive pretty slow, but yes, definitely.

    What kinds of drivers pose the greatest challenges to bicycling in
    our town? Service vehicles? Trucks? People cutting through the town?
    Ourselves? Younger drivers? Distracted drivers?
    People cutting through town, for sure. Out of towners. Rush hour drivers.

    Do you even think safety for bicyclists and pedestrians in our town is an important issue? Why or why not?
    Yes. Either we make a commitment to preserve bike-friendliness and pedestrian-friendliness for residents of our town or we become just a tourist parking lot (think New Hope/Lambertville) or have a West Windsor type character where no one really considers that there are alternative ways to get around and enjoy town without a car.

    Thanks for asking!

  • I forgot to say, I’m 50, I cycle for health, pleasure and because I think private cars are a bad use of the planet’s resources. I use them in all weathers – you can buy a lot of protective clothing for the cost of gas & insurance.

  • Hi. We are moving to Princeton from Europe and plan not to buy a car. I previously lived in Chicago and Cambridge / Boston without a car. I have cycled in those cities in the 1980s and 1990s when there were no bike lanes, and in German, the Netherlands, and Denmark where there are marked bike lanes, often but no more than half the time separate from the road, and in England and Scotland where bike lanes are still unusual. Everyone has told us that it is impossible to cycle entirely in Princeton – and that it wasn’t possible to walk from Plainsboro to Princeton. Both proved false. There is a separate cycle path that runs into Princeton from Plainsboro that is excellent for cycling – assuming it is snow plowed, which I admit is quite a worry. I thought Harrison was excellent as it was. The cycle locking on campus was great, though I haven’t figured out where you are supposed to shower yet, or if shower facilities for cyclists are not available? I think cycling on sidewalks is unethical except for very small children who of course should not be in the road and are unlikely to hit anyone hard enough to knock them over (though they still need to be taught to be careful of this.) In every country the biggest hazard is people who do not treat bicycles like legal vehicles that should occupy their lanes. The worst of these are sloppy cyclists themselves who go the wrong way on roads not marked as two ways for cycles, or blow through traffic lights as if they didn’t apply. This is easily handled by having traffic police ticket them. I was stopped by the police in Edinburgh for cycling near dusk with no lights, and I walked my bike home that day. So I think Princeton is cyclable, but there is a real problem with attitudes about it. I hope we can achieve critical mass and achieve more facilities, such as an extension of the city-bike rental facilities down to Plainsboro Center and Princeton Junction, and bicycle renting at the major hotels.

  • Terri Riendeau

    I commute to work in Princeton most of the year and ride my bike for errands, visits, to the movies — you name it. Motorists are generally respectful. Getting doored by people getting out of their cars on Nassau is my biggest car concern. If I could change one thing, I would get rid of leaf piles. As a homeowner, I love that my leaves don’t have to be bagged. As a cyclist, riding home at night especially, the leaf piles are a hazard. My ride sometimes feels like a slalom run.

  • MB

    I do feel that safety is an issue and an impediment to increasing bike ridership in Princeton. I have biked in many other towns in the US and Canada and feel that my best experiences were in places where there were dedicated bike paths that crisscrossed the town (N-S and E-W) with local exits. These made it easier to get across town safely, separately from cars. And, they were used extensively by many. It might be hard to get this in place but if it could be done, I believe it would be well-loved here in Princeton.

  • M

    Do you bicycle in Princeton? Yes
    What’s good about Princeton for bicycling, and/or what are examples from elsewhere that you wish were true here? Everything is pretty close and the neighborhood roads are pretty safe.
    Where do you bicycle in Princeton? On protected trails? On side streets? On larger streets? All of the above. We bike almost everywhere. Nassau is terrifying with a child’s trailer though so I try to take Hamilton on the sidewalk. We LOVE the canal trail. We use that to bike to Wegman’s and Whole foods.
    Why do you bike? For recreation? For convenience? For health? For economic efficiency or necessity? Everything but convenience. As graduate students we are broke, but we enjoy biking and find it worth it.
    Do you bike for errands? To visit friends? To go to work? Yep! All of it.
    What kinds of bike trips might you like to make but don’t? And why don’t you make those trips? Weather? Road safety? Time? Comfort? Self-image? We don’t like biking to Market Fair mall since Canal Point has so many potholes and the sidewalk isn’t bike friendly. We would LOVE to bike to Quakerbridge mall but there is no safe way to get over route 1
    Does the idea of biking for anything besides recreation seem “normal” to you, or “goofy”? Normal
    Do you feel safe bicycling on streets in Princeton? No I don’t, especially on Nassau, Harrison, Hamilton and Canal Point.
    Do you want to be able to bike more than you do now? Yes.
    If you’d like to bike more, what kinds of things would make the biggest difference for you? More lighting for night biking and a bike lane
    How old are you, and how comfortable a bicyclist are you? 26 and pretty comfortable.
    If you have children, do you discourage them from biking by themselves? She’s too young to bike but I would discourage her. My neighbors don’t allow their kids too either.
    Do your children, if you have any, bike more or less than you did when you were growing up? NA
    Do you wish your children could be more independent? Do you think street safety is an obstacle to their being more independent? NA
    What do you think it would take for cars to drive more carefully around bicycles and pedestrians? I think having more people biking. We’ve been yelled at several times for biking with a child and told that we were irresponsible.
    Would you personally mind driving slower yourself if that meant everyone else were also driving slower? Nope,
    What kinds of drivers pose the greatest challenges to bicycling in our town? Service vehicles? Trucks? People cutting through the town? Ourselves? Younger drivers? Distracted drivers? People who think they are too important to wait for bicyclist. Semis and tour buses going through town – especially downtown.
    Do you even think safety for bicyclists and pedestrians in our town is an important issue? Yes! Cleaner air, healthier people, and less traffic. Fan of all of that.

  • CHRIS

    Do you bicycle in Princeton? YES Do you bicycle or have have you bicycled elsewhere that was much better? YES

    What’s good about Princeton for bicycling, IT IS SCENIC AND YOU CAN GO IN TOWN WITHOUT PARKING ISSUES and/or what are examples from elsewhere that you wish were true here? WE ARE MISSING BIKE LANES. IT IS NOT SAFE.

    Where do you bicycle in Princeton? On protected trails? On side streets? On larger streets?Why do you bike? For recreation? For convenience? For health? For economic efficiency or necessity? I BIKE FOR ALL THESE REASONS AND EVERYWHERE IN TOWN.

    Do you bike for errands? To visit friends? To go to work? ALL. I COMMUTE AND ERRAND.

    What kinds of bike trips might you like to make but don’t? And why
    don’t you make those trips? Weather? Road safety? Time? Comfort?
    Self-image? I DON’T FEEL SAFE ENOUGH

    Does the idea of biking for anything besides recreation seem “normal” to you, or “goofy”? NORMAL

    Do you feel safe bicycling on streets in Princeton? NO

    Do you want to be able to bike more than you do now? YES

    If you’d like to bike more, what kinds of things would make the biggest difference for you?BIKE LANES + BIKE PARKING IN TOWN

    How old are you, and how comfortable a bicyclist are you?50, VERY COMFORTABLE

    If you have children, do you discourage them from biking by themselves? Why or why not? I HAVE 4, I ENCOURAGE THEM BECAUSE IT IS GOOD FOR THE CITY

    Do your children, if you have any, bike more or less than you did when you were growing up?LESS
    Do you wish your children could be more independent? Do you think
    street safety is an obstacle to their being more independent?YES
    What do you think it would take for cars to drive more carefully around bicycles and pedestrians?BIKE LANE SO THEY DON’T FORGET ABOUT US BEING ALLOWED TO BE ON THE STREET AS WELL

    Would you personally mind driving slower yourself if that meant everyone else were also driving slower? NOPE

    What kinds of drivers pose the greatest challenges to bicycling in
    our town? Service vehicles? Trucks? People cutting through the town?
    Ourselves? Younger drivers? Distracted drivers? I THINK A BIT OF EVERYONE,
    i THINK THE TOWN NEED TO ADDRESS THE ISSUE AND NOT JUST SAY “IT’S FINE!” WITH ALL THESE NEW BUILDING AND APARTMENTS IN TOWN, TRAFFIC WILL SOON BECOME CRAZY
    . WE SHOULD HAVE A NICE COMPLETE NETWORK OF BIKE LANE BEFORE IT HAPPENS.

    THANKS

    Do you even think safety for bicyclists and pedestrians in our town is an important issue? Why or why not? YES. JUST MAKE THE CITY NICER.

  • jacks29

    I don’t cycle. I do walk and drive a lot around Princeton. From what I have observed, I don’t think Princeton is a very cycle friendly town. If they plan on doing anything, I would put a bike lane on Franklin Avenue. When picking up my daughter from Community Park Elementary School, I drive down Franklin Avenue from the high school to Witherspoon. There are also many kids biking home on that street as well. They tend to ride haphazardly around the street, and not really obeying common safety rules. I am afraid someone will get hurt one day. Perhaps getting rid of the metered parking there (which is probably put there for the no longer existing hospital) and putting in a bike lane, may make it more safe.
    There will always be ways to improve cycling in Princeton, I think the top priority should be making sure the major roads for kids to bike to school to should be as safe as possible.

  • SpokesMan

    Why not make the questions for drivers instead?

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