|

N.J. governor signs executive order allowing outdoor interstate youth sports competitions

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy on Wednesday signed an exective order that allows outdoor interstate youth sports competitions to take place starting on Friday, March 19.

β€œAs the weather begins to warm up and with outdoor sports seasons looking to begin, I am pleased that we are able to take this step,” Murphy said. β€œThis has been a challenging year, and I am excited to know that our young athletes will soon be competing out on the field.” Β  Β 

School-based, club, and recreational programs are also allowed to host outdoor interstate youth sports competitions outside of New Jersey, or outdoor youth sports competitions outside of New Jersey that would require New Jersey teams to travel to another state.

All non-collegiate and non-professional athletic practices and competitions that are conducted outdoors must abide by outdoor gathering limits. The limit is currently 50 people. Players, coaches, officials, and up to two parents or guardians per athlete are allowed to attend practices or competitions. No additional spectators or attendees will be allowed.

Spectators must follow guidance from the New Jersey Department of Health regarding sports activities, including wearing a mask, observing social distancing, and staying home if sick. Staff, parents, guardians, and visitors are required to wear face coverings at practices and games. Athletes are encouraged to wear masks during downtime, but not during physical activity. Local school districts, collegiate conferences, and other sports operators may impose additional restrictions on spectators.

2 Comments

  1. According to this nj.gov link
    https://covid19.nj.gov/faqs/nj-information/reopening-guidance-and-restrictions/can-organized-sports-resume-what-are-the-safety-requirements-for-sports-facilities

    “Gathering Limits for Sports Practices and Competitions

    “Practices and competitions are limited by the general indoor gatherings limit of 10 people and the general outdoor gatherings limit of 25 people but there are exceptions, described below:

    “For non-collegiate, non-professional sports in venues with fewer than 5,000 seats, the general gathering limits can be exceeded if the only people present are those necessary for practice and competition, such as athletes, coaches, and referees, as well as up to two parents or guardians per athlete under the age of 21. No other spectators may attend. The total number of people for indoor events is capped at 35 percent of the room’s capacity, but no more than 150 people. …”

    This seems to be more permissive than what is stated in the article — perhaps the difference is whether there are uninvolved spectators?

Comments are closed.